Vision Library

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Free Vision Screening

Our next Free Vision Screening is coming up and will be held At Our Gainesville Office location on December 5th. From 9:30 am – 12:30 pm. Make sure to call us and schedule your FREE DEVELOPMENTAL VISION SCREENING today!

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Convergence Insufficiency: Sharpen Skills with Vision Therapy

Both convergence insufficiency and convergence inability are vision disorders that can be treated with vision therapy. Normally developed as a child begins to crawl, the convergence distance changed and encouraged development of the skill every time he or she raised up and gazed around or looked down at the floor. Further development happened on the playground equipment, reaching for bars, ropes and stairs.

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Reversal Frequency: Minding Your P’s and Q’s

While the dyslexic brain processes things differently, with early detection and treatment, significant progress can be made with a combination of vision therapy strategies and intervention. Beginning treatment as early as possible will help keep patients at peer levels in academic achievement and keep self-esteem high. Older patients, however, should not be discouraged from seeking treatment, as progress can be made at any age.

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Test Scores Dip When Vision Disorders Rule

Undetected vision disorders can rob many students of their rightful test scores, as they fight to keep words on the page that jump and dissolve before their very eyes. Almost one in five students has an undetected vision disorder that makes reading harder than it should be due to eye teaming problems.

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Amblyopia and Age: It Is Never Too Late

While it is easier for a young child to benefit from such therapy, a patient and dedicated older child or adult can gain much from the process, bumping up vision to read more quickly and with fewer symptoms of eyestrain such as headaches and blurred vision. Improving the way the eyes work together also restores binocular vision, an important factor in depth perception and coordination.

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Adult Head Trauma

Adult Head Trauma

Do you see with your eyes? Or do you see with your brain? . . . When the brain suffers injury, either from trauma or stroke, the damage done to vision often takes three forms: visual field loss, diplopia (double vision), and/or visual balance disorders.

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Vision Therapy is Not Just for the Eyes: A Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Treating Dyslexia

It is of the utmost importance, when a child exhibits signs of difficulty in reading and cognitive skills, as with dyslexia, to have a thorough evaluation done. Perfect 20/20 vision does not tell the whole story. Nor does a regular physical exam. It is only when the visual and neurological matrix is embraced as an interconnected whole, and all functions relating to visual performance are examined, that an appropriate plan for treatment and management can be derived.

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Vision Therapy: Who Benefits?

Vision therapy can provide struggling students with strategies to improve reading and learning skills, turning dreaded tasks into fun challenges. It can deliver ways to accommodate visual processing disorders to improve performance. Just as many types of exercises and activities can improve physical performance, vision therapy programs can provide the means to crank up vision performance several notches.

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Lazy Eye: Surgery or Therapy?

Treatment of amblyopia usually involves disabling the stronger eye in some way, either patching, drops, or a contact lens, forcing the weaker eye to gradually strengthen and learn to function. Sometimes, a program of disabling is coupled with surgery to physically correct a turned eye. While that presents a cosmetic solution to the problem, the weaker eye still has not been trained to work, and will likely continue to remain weak even though aesthetically normal.

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Vision Therapy: Helping ASD Patients Approach Normal

Many ASD patients suffer from vision disorders related to processing and interpretation of visual images in addition to more common disorders regarding acuity, tracking, eye teaming, focusing, near- or far-sightedness, and astigmatism. Additionally, there is between a 20 and 50 percent greater chance of strabismus in ASD patients than in normal individuals.

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