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Brief Diagnosis Descriptions

Brief Diagnosis Explanations

Exotropia

This is a description of one or both eyes turning outward. This can cause confusion of directions, object locations in space, double vision, headaches and migraines.

Esoptropia

This is a description of one or both eyes turning inward. This can cause confusion of directions, object locations in space, double vision, headaches and migraines.

Vision-VestibularDisturbance

Describes a patient’s lack of integration between the visual and vestibular systems, possibly causing; dizziness, poor balance and lack of awareness of space around them.

Visually-Guided Body Movement (Gross Motor) Deficit

This is a patient’s inability to coordinate large groups of muscles to move in synch and in the intended direction/place in space. This deficit can directly coordinate to the inability to use fine motor skills.

Visual Imagery (Visualization) Deficit

This refers to the inability to recall or create visual images in one’s head.

Refractive Amblyopia

This occurs when one eye’s prescription is significantly stronger than the other eye’s, causing for there to be a more dominant eye and issues with both eyes wanting to work together.

Strabismic Amblyopia

A patient’s eye can have poorer clarity, even when wearing a prescription, when accompanied with the inward or outward turn of that eye. This also causes issues with both eyes wanting to work together, and possibly suppression of the eye with strabismic amblyopia.

Convergence Insufficiency

This describes the eye’s inability to turn towards each other, convergence, whether it is one or both eyes being affected. This can make doing anything within about sixteen inches of the face much more difficult.

Diplopia

This describes a patient seeing two objects when there should only be one, also known as double vision. This can cause confusion when looking at any one point in space and time, as well as, frustration to determine which image is real.

Suppression of Binocular Vision

This refers to a patient turning either their left or right eye off so that they are only seeing the world through one eye. This may cause confusion of space, location, headaches, migraines and frustration.

Deficiency of Saccadic Eye Movement

This describes the inability for the one or both eyes to jump form one object to the next accurately. A patient with this issue may experience difficulties rapidly moving their focus from one location to another, making quick judgments and decisions complicated.

Eye Movement Disorder

This is happens when a patient has ocular-motor deficits that cause one or both eyes to move erratically and without much control.

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